thewayne: (Default)
Every day I eat my breakfast 200 yards from a pelican who'd like nothing better than to put its beak through my brain!


Sorry, been a little ill of late and my brain is always weird. And when you're weird, who better to channel than Jack?!


Anyway, after that flight went down in NYC from birds taking out its engines, the FAA said it was going to release bird strike data. Now they're saying they won't. They say: ""The complexity of the information warrants care with its interpretation; releasing this information without benefit of proper analysis would not only produce an inaccurate perception of the individual airports and airlines but also inaccurate and inappropriate comparisons between airports/airlines," the FAA wrote March 19 in the Federal Register."

Well, I have to agree with them, at least partially. It would be easy for a layperson to misinterpret the data and draw some pretty stupid conclusions. But there's also an awful lot of aviation engineers and wildlife management specialists who would love to see these data sets who would otherwise absolutely love to see this data.

But here's the scary part: "The number of strikes annually reported more than quadrupled from 1,759 in 1990 to a record 7,666 in 2007."

http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2009/03/faa-says-public.html
thewayne: (Default)
Interesting article. It currently takes 1,000 megawatts(!) of energy to produce 160 gallons of fuel. A process that's been refined for almost as long as we've been driving cars that converts coal into liquid fuel produces the same amount of gas but requires 350 megawatts.

Great savings, neh?

Neh.

It does nothing to reduce greenhouse gasses and doubles the amount of CO2 being released.

So, lower fuel prices for the cost of more CO2? Doesn't seem too good of a deal. But it could be a good bridging technology to keep cars on the road while other fuel/automobile technologies come to market. I wonder if they could make an improved catalytic converter-like device that could be a move effective CO2 scrubber, but then you get problems with the Sontarans (if you're a Doctor Who follower).

http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/03/coaltoliquids.html

Ice Castles

Jan. 1st, 2009 03:55 pm
thewayne: (Default)
I've heard of ice hotels and such. Right now in Las Vegas (not the one in New Mexico) they've built an ice bar in a huge freezer warehouse where you can buy tickets for 30 minutes that include a free drink (in a bowl of ice, natch') and rental of furs to keep you warm. This article talks about a company who uses CNC milling equipment to pre-fab such things and ships them around the world.

Some interesting bits, such as an ice hotel in Alaska that had to close and reopen as a museum when a building inspector decided it needed sprinklers. Yeah, it's a tragedy how many people die every year in ice hotel fires.

Yes, I am a geek. I think this is pretty cool, no pun intended. Maybe.

http://www.wired.com/culture/design/magazine/17-01/ff_ice_king?currentPage=all
thewayne: (Default)
My personal favorite is Tulta munille! I wonder if I could get a bumper sticker....

http://www.wired.com/culture/culturereviews/magazine/16-08/st_best
thewayne: (Default)
This has been tested in mice, there's no telling when this might make it to people trials.

I find it interesting when one drug finds application against a different disease. A friend of mine who is going to die of ALS (Lou Gherrig's Disease) was in a drug trial where they tested a drug previously used to treat Alzheimers patients and it showed some good results against ALS. The problem is that drug insurance won't pay for it because it is labeled for use if you have Alzheimers.

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=existing-drug-reverses-a&sc=rss

http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/06/27/1210202
thewayne: (Default)
It's here. NVidia and ATI have released some nasty fast video cards that, if someone can figure out how to program them for general computation use, will offer an amazing amount of power. I'm sure there's a grad student somewhere right now writing up a thesis proposal to code it.

http://www.wired.com/techbiz/it/news/2008/06/gpu_power
thewayne: (Default)
Sort of. It was 124 years ago that the first gravity roller coaster opened on Coney Island. The article has a little history and some interesting bits of tid about the Matterhorn at Disneyland.

http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/news/2008/06/dayintech_0616
thewayne: (Default)
For example, Paris Hilton:

Paris Hilton
Actress
Chaotic Neutral Human
Strength: 9
Intelligence: 9
Wisdom: 8
Constitution: 10
Dexterity: 14
Charisma: 18
Special Abilities: Wiggling out of jail time for DUI charges, washing cars in an entertaining manner.

Personally I think her int and wis are at least 1 point high. The descriptions for Bush & Cheney are pretty funny.

http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/03/guess-the-add-s.html
thewayne: (Default)
I'm very happy to see that Duke Nukem Forever is still hangin' in there! Wired disqualified it last year because it had been in the charts for so long, but there's been new screen shots and hype about it, plus apparently an overwhelming number of votes, so The Duke Is Back!

http://www.wired.com/gadgets/gadgetreviews/multimedia/2007/12/YE_Vaporware
thewayne: (Default)
Not a bad list, and you can add to it if you know of an original one!

http://www.wired.com/culture/lifestyle/magazine/15-11/st_best
thewayne: (Default)
Weird, but makes sense.

http://blog.wired.com/cars/2007/08/study-claims-th.html

As the world's stock markets fret and swoon over tightening credit, car buyers might take a pop in the nose from a different source. "Household Credit Usage," a clumsy title for a forthcoming book from Palgrave MacMillan, argues that the interest rates charged for car loans should be adjusted for the car purchased. The book studied some 7,000 loans from a single bank made from 1998 through 2003. It found that Saturn buyers were 22 times more likely to default on their loans than were Toyota buyers. In fact, loans secured for Japanese cars in general were 56 percent less likely to go into default than loans for American cars. Loans for European cars were 50 percent less likely. Brent Ambrose, a professor at Penn State's Smeal College of Business and lead author of the study, argues that loans for American cars should have significantly higher interest rates to compensate for the higher default risk. And American car makers that offer their own financing should raise prices on their automobiles to pay for these risks. Of course, that means that if you pay cash for your Saturn, you'd be underwriting the deadbeats.

Source: BusinessWeek

Read More
thewayne: (Default)
A review of some of the absinthe currently being imported. Sadly, the reviewer's fav is an import at $170 a bottle.

http://www.wired.com/culture/lifestyle/news/2007/07/absinthe

July 2017

S M T W T F S
       1
23 4567 8
910 11 1213 14 15
16 17 18 19 202122
23242526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 22nd, 2017 12:52 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios